(08) 9419 1855 admin@kic.org.au
published September 20, 2021 on The West Australian
Pumping $16 billion into the state’s economy, the Kwinana Industrial Area (KIA) is a significant economic driver in Western Australia.
Responsible for the direct and indirect employment of more than 30,000 people – with two-thirds of this number living in the local area – the KIA has been a training ground for a large number of apprentices and trainees for decades.

The economic benefits for the Rockingham, Kwinana and Cockburn areas, and the State overall, have largely been due to KIA’s economic sustainability.

Kwinana Industries Council (KIC) Director Chris Oughton said the industrial area was literally one of the world’s best practice examples of industrial symbiosis at work.

KIC-Industry-bhp-north-west
“The ability to exchange materials like this greatly helps a company to be internationally competitive and more economically sustainable into the future because their costs of production are reduced.”
Linking to the energy, minerals and agriculture industries, Mr Oughton said the KIA was a supplier of essential inputs and value-adding to processors of primary outputs.

“Something else the KIC does is show potential new industries around the industrial area. We are pleased to help industry proponents decide where the best place is for them to set up their businesses, and we can assist them through the myriad steps in the various approvals processes.”

“These new enterprises bring new jobs and economic growth to the nearby community and to the state, and they participate in the synergy exchanges, to their benefit.”

A key goal of the KIC is to maintain and enhance the community environment to benefit both the community and industry. More than half of its financial support is provided to the Cockburn, Rockingham and Kwinana community.

“The relationship between Kwinana industry and the local community is strengthened by a shared environment and a desire to be good neighbours,” Mr Oughton said.
“Over the years KIC has, and continues to, provide financial support for a range of community activities, and so too do its individual industrial members.

“The KIC Public Affairs and Communications Advisory Group routinely considers requests for community investment.

A community benefit KIC has created and grown over the years is its Education Development Program (EDP).

The program is a partnership with 19 high local schools.  It is focused on showcasing available career paths to the students around what industry has to offer.

2021 KIC iMEN Project Students (Term 2)
“The KIC EDP is about showing our partnership high school students the types of careers that are available in industry and working with the students in a practical sense as to how they might aspire to these careers,” Mr Oughton said.

The EDP has won both state and international awards for its excellence.

“For Year 11 and 12 students, we run several pre-apprenticeship courses in association with the South Metropolitan TAFE.

“We have in the vicinity of 300 students per year passing through our courses and many amazing success stories to tell.

“KIC and its members are very proud of the achievements of the program.”